Tag Archives: natural

The magic of yeasts

Yeast

Yeast

Yeasts are fungi, which play a vital role in wine production. The number of different species runs into tens or even hundreds of thousands, no one is quite sure. More than one may be used in fermenting the grapes, and this has a big influence on the wine produced. Yeasts produce aromatic compounds as well as alcohol and carbon dioxide.

What yeasts need to make them work
Yeasts need the right conditions to work their magic during wine fermentation:-

  • Temperature. They operate in a temperature range. Too low, and yeasts don’t function, too high and they are killed off. The grape juice may be actively heated or cooled to achieve this.
  • Nutrients. Sugar is the main one, but you need a source of nitrogen, which is provided by amino acids. Winemakers may add selected nutrients.
  • Alcohol level. Different yeasts work in different ranges of alcohol content.

Winemakers split yeasts into two main categories

  • ‘Natural’ or ‘wild’ yeasts. These are the yeasts which are present in the vineyard, and stick to the grape skins. They are also on the wine equipment. These indigenous yeasts give the wine a local character, a sense of place. The term ‘terroir’ is often used to express this.
  • Cultured yeasts. These are developed to introduce particular characteristics to the wine, or to make fermentation more reliable. Usually, the indigenous bugs will be killed off with sulphur dioxide, and then the grape must/juice will be inoculated with the cultured yeast.

What can go wrong with a ‘wild yeast fermentation’

  • Problems with starting the fermentation. The grape must/juice will contain a range of bacteria as well as yeasts, and these compete for the nutrients. You may end up with acetic acid (vinegar) rather than alcohol.
  • Inconsistency. A number of different yeasts may be involved during a fermentation, with some dying off at quite low alcohol levels, and others taking over. If a different yeast takes over, you can end up with a different wine than you anticipated.

Conclusion
There is no right or wrong answer about the use of wild yeasts, it rather depends on the market you are aiming at. Cultured yeasts will help to produce a consistent product, which is going to appeal to the big brands. Small producers may well enjoy the variability.

Is there a perfect temperature for storing wine?

temperature and humidity recorder

temperature and humidity recorder

Wine is an organic living thing. The temperature a wine experiences can have a big influence on its quality.

So, is there a perfect temperature?
Time has shown that deep cellars in temperature parts of Europe are perfect for wine storage. A constant temperature of around 12°C (54°F) is ideal. A high humidity prevents the cork from drying out.

Increased temperature leads to increased reaction rates
Wine is a complicated mixture of chemicals, which react with each other. As the temperature rises, all of the reaction rates will increase, but some will increase more rapidly than others.

Increased temperature leads to new reaction products
As the temperature rises, new reactions will occur, which simply wouldn’t happen at 12°C. An example is the breakdown of aromatic chemicals in dry white wines. Unpleasant compounds are also produced.

Wines with low sulphites/sulphur dioxide
Natural wines with low levels of sulphites (sulphur dioxide) are increasingly popular. Sulphur dioxide serves two very useful functions:-

  • to limit oxidation of the wine.
  • prevent bacterial growth.

Both of these become much more of an issue as a wine’s temperature rises, and natural wines are particularly vulnerable.

Unfiltered wines
If the temperature gets too high, it is perfectly possible to restart fermentation . This causes plenty of problems.

What if the temperature is lower than 12°C (54°F)?
As the temperature decreases, the reaction rates slow down. So, a wine may not mature in the normal way, but at least it won’t go off. If a wine gets cold enough it may deposit white tartrate crystals, but these do no harm. The alcohol in wine depresses its freezing point, so it needs to be well below 0°C (32°F) before it even starts to freeze.

Conclusion
If you live in a climate where the temperature is above 25°C (77°F), and you don’t have dedicated wine storage, then please keep ALL your wine in a domestic fridge. You will have to remember to take the red out in good time before drinking it, but at least the wine will be in good condition.